Choose your niche and check for demand: The golden course combination is when you can find an in-demand niche that aligns with your skills and unique experiences. A great way to do this is to use Google Trends and Google’s Keyword Planner to look for average monthly search volume for keywords related to your proposed course content. Are people actively looking for high-quality information about this subject? Of course, if you’re already creating content for a blog, coaching service, or a site like Medium, you can test demand this way for free just like Bryan did.
Make your content shareable. Google has been fairly secretive about the direct impact of social engagement on SEO, but all signs point to social media being a big factor: Hootsuite ran an in-depth study recently that revealed the benefits of social media shares on SEO, Kissmetric argues it’s important as well and Neil Patel even calls social the new SEO. Therefore, make sure that you optimize your content for social media: use images and videos, create social media tiles, add descriptions with relevant hashtags and include your brand name. Additionally, add social media share buttons to your blog so users can spread the word with a single click. Tools like Sumo are available for free, simple to integrate and easy to use.

While some might think that starting a blog is an arduous effort, when you understand the precise steps you need to take, it becomes far easier. It all starts in the decision of choosing a profitable niche and picking the right domain name. From there, you need to build your offers. You can easily sell things like mini-email courses, full-blown trainings, ebooks, and so on.
If you close the payment account, you must notify Bank and identify a new payment account for the selected Services. If you do not notify us of a new payment account, then we will apply charges to any of your open Accounts. Additionally, if you close all Accounts, you must notify our Cash Management Department to cancel Cash Management Services and we will bill you for unpaid charges, which you agree to pay upon receipt.
What’s the catch? None, really. Cash back apps act as affiliates for many online merchants, which means that whenever you make a purchase through one of the apps, they get a small commission — but then, they give you a portion of that commission as “cash back”. For example, if I buy a pair of Nike shoes through the Ebates app (or website) and spend $75, Ebates may get a $10 commission but then they’ll pass $7 back to me. It’s basically a way to get sale prices on stuff that isn’t on sale!
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