We will provide you with a Security Code to access Cash Management Services.  You agree to:  (a) change your Security Code immediately upon accessing the site; (b) comply with all security procedures we agree to provide to you in connection with Cash Management Services; (c) take reasonable steps to safeguard the confidentiality and security of the Security Code and any other proprietary property or information we provide to you in connection with the Services; (d) limit access to your Security Codes to persons who have a need to know such information; (e) closely and regularly monitor the activities of employees who access Cash Management Services.
The first follows the startup path we outlined above: You have a disruptive idea for an app or piece of software, you validate the idea with real customers, and then raise money to hire developers or a development studio to build, launch, and scale your software. If you’ve done everything right, your software will be accepted to the Apple and Google Stores and you’ll make money every time someone downloads it or pays for a premium feature.
What’s the catch? None, really. Cash back apps act as affiliates for many online merchants, which means that whenever you make a purchase through one of the apps, they get a small commission — but then, they give you a portion of that commission as “cash back”. For example, if I buy a pair of Nike shoes through the Ebates app (or website) and spend $75, Ebates may get a $10 commission but then they’ll pass $7 back to me. It’s basically a way to get sale prices on stuff that isn’t on sale!
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