Now, I know what you’re thinking. Most of the software and apps you use on a regular basis are made by massive companies or established development studios. Well, yes. But many successful apps, particularly those in the Apple and Google stores, are created and marketed by individuals and small businesses. In fact, independent developers made $20 billion in the App Store in 2016 alone.

How trustworthy is your website? Are you getting a lot of backlinks from high-quality websites or is your website virtually irrelevant to Google and other search engine robots? Are you distributing your posts across different platforms and are people sharing them on social media? Domain authority is the third element of the ‘holy trinity’ of securing organic traffic.


Create high-quality, helpful, long-form content. Increasing post frequency alone isn’t enough, so don’t prioritize quantity over quality! For instance, publishing lots of brief articles is a useless strategy since the internet is already full of really good articles and in-depth guides from high domain-authority sites. In order to outrank them, your content needs to be ten times better.
You must consider mobile optimization to improve the rankings of your SERP’s on the mobile platform. This is especially important moving forward as an increasing number of searches are completed on mobile devices. As Martech reports currently up to 50% of all Google searches are completed on mobile devices. If the competition in your niche doesn’t bother with mobile optimization then you’ll have the advantage.

Amazon Mechanical Turk is a service that lets you make money online through doing paid microtasks. Each task is something simple that requires human interaction like rating search results, checking for the right spelling on search terms, categorizing the tone of an article, or even basic translating. You can do these tasks from anywhere you want and make money online from the world’s largest e-retailer.
What’s the catch? None, really. Cash back apps act as affiliates for many online merchants, which means that whenever you make a purchase through one of the apps, they get a small commission — but then, they give you a portion of that commission as “cash back”. For example, if I buy a pair of Nike shoes through the Ebates app (or website) and spend $75, Ebates may get a $10 commission but then they’ll pass $7 back to me. It’s basically a way to get sale prices on stuff that isn’t on sale!
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