You’ve heard these words billion times. Write quality content; Content is king and Blah Blah Blah, and this is true. Always write content based on needs of your readers and which is relevant to your blog niche. For example – This article is for people, who want to learn tactics on increase search engine traffic and to make people understand how organic traffic will help their blog.
The first step to digging into organic traffic is to analyze what content on your website is performing best in this area. For obvious reasons, the homepage is almost certainly the landing page for most organic traffic, but the other top pages are often revealing. To view this data, we’re going to head over to the Behaviour section in the Analytics sidebar, then choose Site Content and finally Landing Pages.

If you have a propensity for writing and you can slay with your prose, consider writing an ebook. While the market has certainly become saturated as of late, books that help teach people about a technical topic still sell extremely well. This is a great source of passive income but does require a large amount of effort at the outset before any money is generated.
In 2017, there were almost 90 million pet dogs in the US. Which has opened up a huge opportunity to make money online as a dog watcher or sitter. Specialized sites like Rover or Care.com connect pet owners with pet walkers, sitters, and boarding houses to help look after their best friends when they’re at work or on a trip. If you’re an animal lover, you can make extra money and get to spend some quality time with a furry friend.
While it may be difficult to outrank the key players in your industry for extremely competitive terms, ranking well in the areas in which your business excels — and the content niche you’re looking to dominate — is surprisingly attainable. By being realistic about what you can achieve and remaining flexible in your efforts to achieve it, your blog can begin to form the centerpiece of your wider content program; all you have to do is write, and write strategically!

What’s the catch? None, really. Cash back apps act as affiliates for many online merchants, which means that whenever you make a purchase through one of the apps, they get a small commission — but then, they give you a portion of that commission as “cash back”. For example, if I buy a pair of Nike shoes through the Ebates app (or website) and spend $75, Ebates may get a $10 commission but then they’ll pass $7 back to me. It’s basically a way to get sale prices on stuff that isn’t on sale!
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